Achilles' Heel Tendinitis Treatment and Drugs

Treatments and drugs

By Mayo Clinic Staff
 

Tendinitis usually responds well to self-care measures. But if your signs and symptoms are severe or persistent, your doctor might suggest other treatment options.

Medications

If over-the-counter pain medications — such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or naproxen (Aleve) — aren't enough, your doctor might prescribe stronger medications to reduce inflammation and relieve pain.

 

Physical therapy

A physical therapist might suggest some of the following treatment options:

  • Exercises. Therapists often prescribe specific stretching and strengthening exercises to promote healing and strengthening of the Achilles tendon and its supporting structures.

    A special type of strengthening called "eccentric" strengthening, involving a slow let down of a weight after raising it, has been found to be especially helpful for persistent Achilles problems.

  • Orthotic devices. A shoe insert or wedge that slightly elevates your heel can relieve strain on the tendon and provide a cushion that lessens the amount of force exerted on your Achilles tendon.

Surgery

If several months of more-conservative treatments don't work or if the tendon has torn, your doctor may suggest surgery to repair your Achilles tendon.

Note: Always consult a medical doctor before doing any of the above. They are experts in the matter and can help you make the best choice. See our Medical Advice Warnings as we are not doctors and do not provide medical advice.

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